I’ve been luring Finn with lollipops…
if he can pronounce the L’s in them correctly. It works!


I’ve decided to be a little more proactive about Finn’s speech. So far I have simply allowed him to go at his own pace and not tried to press him, fearing I would aggravate him. No longer. Last night I got out a paper and pen, sat Finn down on his bed, and in lieu of reading a book went through sounds via the alphabet and zeroed in on what he has trouble with. Main culprits: L and V. If a word has an L or V in it he has trouble with the whole thing. His solution is to skip it or to find a different pronunciation that works better for him. This has resulted in sentences like “I you, Ober” (I love you, Oliver). On top of this he has trouble with k, r, n, h, and th. You can imagine how difficult he is to understand!

After figuring out which sounds he has trouble with, my next step is to work on the sounds themselves, before the words. And then the words, before the sentences. Last night I helped him to figure out how to make the V sound. He got so excited when he realized he could do it. He said “Oh!” When I said we were done he wanted to keep going. He said “have” for the fist time last night. This morning we started working on L. I found a site that has proved to be very useful to me:
mommyspeechtherapy
She taught me how to use my finger to touch the tip of Finn’s tongue and the place behind his teeth he needs to touch with it to say L. We worked on La La La, Lu Lu Lu. Then I went and got a lollipop and started sucking it. “I wawipop! I wawipop!” I told him he had to say it correctly. “I
have wawipop?” Ha ha..it wasn’t perfect, and it took a lot longer than one try..but he got it. I can’t wait for him to call Wucy… Lucy! Thank you all for your suggestions. I definitely feel urged to get this corrected at an early age. I expected people to say, “oh it’s no big deal. Just give it time.” and make my fears go away, but instead this has lit a fire under me. So I’m going to keep working with him, correcting incorrect speech until he gets tired of saying everything wrong. I’ll see what his pediatrician says in two weeks for his 3 and half year appointment. If he hasn’t progressed by the time he is 4 I will take him to be evaluated by a speech therapist.

Finn just asked for a Mashmeyow. With the reward of one, I got him to say marshmallow. Well…smarshmeadow. But it’s a step in the right direction!

Eliza…where are my confounded slippers?!!

14 thoughts on “

  1. awesome! I got the book Reading Reflex for Abbi which has been an awesome way to learn to read, but first with the main sounds.Reading is not what you are focusing on now, but you should check out the book for things to help him with now.It is definatly a great way to learn as the phonic based method we all grew up with and they use in public schools has resulted in our country having a 40% of kids not knowing how to read! SHOCKING!

  2. awesome! I got the book Reading Reflex for Abbi which has been an awesome way to learn to read, but first with the main sounds.Reading is not what you are focusing on now, but you should check out the book for things to help him with now.It is definatly a great way to learn as the phonic based method we all grew up with and they use in public schools has resulted in our country having a 40% of kids not knowing how to read! SHOCKING!

  3. Bridget, we have the same speech issues with Ian! Its been nice to find out other people's kids of the same age have the same issues! :)We have worked a lot with him on his L's, as well as S-blends (skate, spit, smile, snake, etc.) We had taken him to a speech evaluator, and she said those two sounds were pivotal for the 3-4 year old age, as well as k's. So it sounds like you are right on target!

  4. Bridget, we have the same speech issues with Ian! Its been nice to find out other people's kids of the same age have the same issues! :)We have worked a lot with him on his L's, as well as S-blends (skate, spit, smile, snake, etc.) We had taken him to a speech evaluator, and she said those two sounds were pivotal for the 3-4 year old age, as well as k's. So it sounds like you are right on target!

  5. Not sure where my comment went. I left one yesterday on your needing help with speech post. :-( I hope it went through.Anyway…today I got a newsletter in the mail from the place my son has his speech therapy and it talked about this same issue! I thought there were a couple very good points and so thought I would share.- When your child attempts a word but the word is mispronounced, repeat it back slowly stretching out the word and emphasizing the sound or sounds that have been produced in error. Ex. If your child says, "bana", repeat back "ba-NA-na." Your repetition let's your child know you are listening and recognize the attempt at communication. Do not try to make your child say a word correctly. Don't say: "Say it this way." Or "Say banana". If your child spontaneously repeats your model, praise him/her for the effort.- Reinforce all verbal attempts with positive interactions. Affirm your child's message by repeating it back to them with adult forms. Example: Your child says, "tae" for train. Smile and repeat "Train. You want tr-ai-n." This affirms that you understood their message and give them more time to hear how the word is pronounced. Avoid having them repeat you: don't say, "say train" or "say it like mommy."I hope these tips help! Try not to stress about it too much though. It sounds like you are on the right track.

  6. Not sure where my comment went. I left one yesterday on your needing help with speech post. :-( I hope it went through.Anyway…today I got a newsletter in the mail from the place my son has his speech therapy and it talked about this same issue! I thought there were a couple very good points and so thought I would share.- When your child attempts a word but the word is mispronounced, repeat it back slowly stretching out the word and emphasizing the sound or sounds that have been produced in error. Ex. If your child says, "bana", repeat back "ba-NA-na." Your repetition let's your child know you are listening and recognize the attempt at communication. Do not try to make your child say a word correctly. Don't say: "Say it this way." Or "Say banana". If your child spontaneously repeats your model, praise him/her for the effort.- Reinforce all verbal attempts with positive interactions. Affirm your child's message by repeating it back to them with adult forms. Example: Your child says, "tae" for train. Smile and repeat "Train. You want tr-ai-n." This affirms that you understood their message and give them more time to hear how the word is pronounced. Avoid having them repeat you: don't say, "say train" or "say it like mommy."I hope these tips help! Try not to stress about it too much though. It sounds like you are on the right track.

  7. Also keep in mind that some of his missing speech sounds are totally age appropriate. It is not uncommon for kids to mispronounce R's until well into 1st grade. My oldest is in speech at school and the first sound he worked on was L =D It also depends on how he is saying the L incorrectly. If he transposes the sound into a Y rather than the L it can mean something different than if he transposes the sound into a W. I am sure that all the info is on a website somewhere too! Because until I had to deal with Andrew I had no idea which sounds he should be doing correctly at age 5 and which ones were ok for the time being. In fact by the time he got to the R sounds he had almost completely self corrected them. Keep on working with him. There is nothing more frustrating for both of you than not being understood!

  8. Also keep in mind that some of his missing speech sounds are totally age appropriate. It is not uncommon for kids to mispronounce R's until well into 1st grade. My oldest is in speech at school and the first sound he worked on was L =D It also depends on how he is saying the L incorrectly. If he transposes the sound into a Y rather than the L it can mean something different than if he transposes the sound into a W. I am sure that all the info is on a website somewhere too! Because until I had to deal with Andrew I had no idea which sounds he should be doing correctly at age 5 and which ones were ok for the time being. In fact by the time he got to the R sounds he had almost completely self corrected them. Keep on working with him. There is nothing more frustrating for both of you than not being understood!

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